the commercial property is empty, can the landlord gain access?

we have not paid the rent for 6 months, but still have stock in the building, can the landlord gain access without our permission
In Leasing Property - Asked by Gill L. - Feb 9, 2017
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Answer(s)

Maggie B.
Owner/Investor
Wynnewood, PA

yes

Feb 9, 2017
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beahyun c.
Owner/Investor
Fayetteville, NC

1year free

Feb 9, 2017
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Dave G.
Broker/Agent
Bartlett, IL

Landlord should always have access to any building they own. If anything bad happens in the unit like a pipe breaking then can access the unit to fix the problem without your permission.

Feb 9, 2017
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Matt W.
Broker/Agent
Whittier, CA

If you have a lease and you have not received a notice of belief of abandonment or 3 day notice to pay or quit, they cannot access the building unless there is an emergency to take care of per Dave's comment below.

Feb 10, 2017
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william s.
Appraiser
Pauls Valley, OK

unless emergency no,

Feb 12, 2017
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Jim T.
Owner/Investor
Abilene, TX

It depends on where you are and what your lease says. For instance, in Texas, if the lease says so, the Landlord can enter into the property and take possession of anything left in the building and sell it in order to settle the debt you them.

Feb 13, 2017
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Rex B.
Broker/Agent
Savannah, GA

Gill:
It's subject to first what your lease says regarding access, "quite enjoyment,"abandonment, if notice is required, etc. If the lease is silent on these points, it likely defaults to what your state law dictates. If you are unsure, consult a lawyer.

Feb 13, 2017
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John B.
Broker/Agent
NOCITY, IL

yes but he shoulden

Feb 14, 2017
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Gerald S.
Kent, OH

No. Needs attorney and court assistance.

Feb 18, 2017
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Juanita A.
Broker/Agent
Hallandale, FL

Only for emergencies. Other scenarios depend on what your lease says (for example, if you have abandoned the premises, etc) but in general, the Landlord needs to complete an eviction process to gain access.

Feb 23, 2017
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Francis L.
Broker/Agent
Santa Clarita, CA

It depends on the verbiage in your lease agreement relating to specific clauses such as non-payment of rent, abandonment of property, and/or any governing agencies and their applicable laws in your state. I'm not an attorney and recommend that you seek the appropriate legal advice. Especially since you haven't paid your rent. Access for emergency situations are not the same as what your doing or have failed to do. Just my .02

Feb 23, 2017
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