"Tenant hires and takes from Landlord". I have negotiated leases for yrs & have never questioned it. Meaning?

I am working on a lease for a client, and they have asked about legal terms such as premises, demise, etc. which I know the basis of. I assume that this term goes back to old English law. Anyone know the history of this term?
In Leasing Property - Asked by Alan R. - Nov 2, 2012
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Chris R.
Broker/Agent
Denton, TX

Premises are land and buildings together considered as a property. This usage arose from property owners finding the word in their title deeds, where it originally correctly meant "the aforementioned; what this document is about", from Latin prae-missus = "placed before".
In this sense, the word is always used in the plural, but singular in construction. Note that a single house or a single other piece of property is "premises", not a "premise", although the word "premises" is plural in form; e.g. "The equipment is located on the customer's premises", never "The equipment is located on the customer's premise". land, and all the built structures on it, especially when considered as a single place.

Nov 5, 2012
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Chris R.
Broker/Agent
Denton, TX

Demise: (law) The conveyance or transfer of an estate, either in fee for life or for years, most commonly the latter.

Nov 5, 2012
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