Please define the Commercial Building Class A, B or C..

In General Area - Asked by Larry K. - Feb 26, 2013
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Answer(s)

Jason P.
Broker/Agent
Clearwater, FL

Class A means excellent location and amenities that will attract the highest quality tenants, superior construction and finish, professional onsite management.
Class B means good location, management, construction, and tenancy. (Low end of Class A).
Class C means older building with increasing functional and/or economic obsolescence.
Class D means building in need of extensive renovation as a result of functional obsolescence or deterioration.

Feb 26, 2013
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Michael L.
Broker/Agent
Altadena, CA

Class A: When you walk in you say WOW, nice marble on floor in lobby, real wood paneling on elevator walls, public bathrooms are nice enough to live in, offices are over the top.
Class B: Not bad, looks like it was nice not too long ago, getting a little long in the tooth, carpet in elevator looks like it has had some fun.
Class C: Makes you want to break out your checkbook and pay for paint and new floor covering.
Class D: Makes a Crack House look good.

Feb 26, 2013
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James O.
Broker/Agent
Sammamish, WA

Class A Building classification system; defined by BOMA as the most prestigious buildings competing for premier office users with above average rental rates for the area along with high-quality standard finishes, state of the art systems, exceptional accessibility and a definite market presence
Class B Building classification; defined by BOMA as buildings competing for a wide range of users with rents in the average range for the area. Building finishes are fair to good for the area and the systems are adequate, but the building does not compete with Class A at the same price.
Class C Building classification; defined by BOMA as buildings competing for tenants requiring functional space at rents below the average for the area.

Feb 27, 2013
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Rob B.
Chandler, AZ

Larry.....
The BOMA (Building Owners and Managers Association) shown:
Class A Building classification system; defined by BOMA as the most prestigious buildings competing for premier office users with above average rental rates for the area along with high-quality standard finishes, state of the art systems, exceptional accessibility and a definite market presence
Class B Building classification; defined by BOMA as buildings competing for a wide range of users with rents in the average range for the area. Building finishes are fair to good for the area and the systems are adequate, but the building does not compete with Class A at the same price.
Class C Building classification; defined by BOMA as buildings competing for tenants requiring functional space at rents below the average for the area.
In addition, in your evaluation, be sure that each class of building is appropriately suited for where it is located. In the case of a building that is above its class for the location, the actual price of the property may be downgraded.
With a building of a lower class that is located in a higher class location, there may be a great opportunity for value added improvements of the building that will add to an increase in rents.
Onward and Upward....
Rob Baird
CA DRE 544165 (one of the oldest active licenses in the State)
AZ DRE BR6413605000
rob@capratecommercial.com
Onward and Upward....

Feb 28, 2013
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Keith S.
Appraiser
Newport Beach, CA

Class "A" varies by location - Class "A" in New York is different than Class "A" in South Carolina. So, it is dependent upon where you are.

Feb 28, 2013
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