Parking ratios seem fuzzy from your explanation. Could you be more specific in how to figure

I need a specific example of a specific size building say with 28 spaces.
How big should you figure a parking space size (sf)
In General Area - Asked by Diane G. - May 3, 2011
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Answer(s)

Robert W.
Broker/Agent
Akron, OH

For many retail or commercial properties, parking ratios are frequently expressed as number of spaces ore thousand square feet of building..... i.e. - 4:1 would mean there are 4 parking spaces for each thousand square feet of building on a property. Using your example of 28 spaces, if the building was 7,000 sf, then the property has a 4:1 parking ratio. If instead, it was a 4,000 sf building with the same 28 spaces, the property would be parked at a 7:1 ratio. Although it's not my primary domain (I work mostly in retail restaurant), I would imagine there are similar nomenclatures for apartment properties and hotels where the ratio might be expressed as spaces per rental unit or lodging "key"' rather than against 1,000 sf. Hope this is what you were looking for.

May 4, 2011
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Robert W.
Broker/Agent
Akron, OH

One last thought, in case you are trying to determine how much land you need per parking space there are a host of variables ranging from the minimum stall size which can go from 9x18 for compact angle parking to 10x20 for standard perpendiculars, and even more for handicap accessibles. Since you need aisle space of about 25 feet for backing out and if two adjacent rows use the same space, the per parking space land requirement is at least 270 SF but could approach 400 SF of land or more dependent upon layout efficiency, green space and setback requirements of planning /zoning, etc.

May 4, 2011
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Robert W.
Broker/Agent
Akron, OH

For many retail or commercial properties, parking ratios are frequently expressed as number of spaces ore thousand square feet of building..... i.e. - 4:1 would mean there are 4 parking spaces for each thousand square feet of building on a property. Using your example of 28 spaces, if the building was 7,000 sf, then the property has a 4:1 parking ratio. If instead, it was a 4,000 sf building with the same 28 spaces, the property would be parked at a 7:1 ratio. Although it's not my primary domain (I work mostly in retail restaurant), I would imagine there are similar nomenclatures for apartment properties and hotels where the ratio might be expressed as spaces per rental unit or lodging "key"' rather than against 1,000 sf. Hope this is what you were looking for.

May 4, 2011
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Rob B.
Chandler, AZ

Dennis...
May I give my "props" to Robert W. He really gave you a thorough and totally understandable set of answers in his reply to your question.
However, you should check with your local planning and zoning agency to determine what the standards are for "your town".
Onward and upward Dennis... Rob Baird, CA RE License #544165 (One of the oldest, active licenses in CA) 951 515-5855 Email: robertbaird@NewportCpC.com

May 4, 2011
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JOHN R.
Broker/Agent
Tampa, FL

IN THE CITY OF TAMPA PARKING RATIOS ARE DETERMINED BY USE. FOR EXAMPLE,
MEDICAL-6/1,000 SQ FT, OFFICE-3.3/1,000 SQ FT, FURNITURE STORE-1/1,000 SQ FT,
SERVICE (SALON)-8/1,000 SQ FT. ETC/USE.
IF THE SITE DOES NOT COMPLY WITH CODE USER WOULD HAVE TO GET A VARIANCE.
JOHN REAVES

May 12, 2011
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