How can I know what to expect eonomically in the future in a certain area?

Are there any websites or other sources of info or indicators that can help me see whether multifamily properties will still be filled in 5 years?
In Buying Property - Asked by David R M. - Sep 8, 2011
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Answer(s)

Karen M.
Owner/Investor
Fairfax, VA

There's only one person I know of who can provide that kind of info and have it be solid. Their website is www.investorhousingalerts.com. His background is MBA from Harvard, and decades of doing this kind of high level analysis for large, institutional investors. For whatever reason, he's decided recently to open this info up to other investors (fortunately, he's an investor too-- about $100 million or so). I had been looking for this, too, as a multifamily investor who wants to maximize my investments and who is especially tired of useless predictions about certain markets based on little info they can show to support their assertions. Naturally the info is not free but the great news is that you can buy the software just for your market and pay very little. Or you can expand and track the data for states, regions, or the whole country. This way you can buy where the markets are about to get hot. It's a GREAT way to lock into growing the equity in your property. Good luck and remember, rely on the numbers! Go to his company's site and watch the video which explains their ongoing work. Impressive and perfect for what most investors need in their business.

Sep 10, 2011
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Jordan H.
Broker/Agent
Columbia, SC

In my opinion that is more of a state and federal question. If the federal government decides to slow the wheels of single family lending down then multifamily demand will increase (What will Fannie and Freddie do?). Also, if states and even counties change property tax structure on non-homestead properties then the game could change significantly. For instance, in SC homeowners who live in there home my pay $1,000 per year in taxes but when they move out and decide to rent to a tenant the taxes could go to $3-$4,000 per year immediately.

Sep 12, 2011
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