Does buyer pay for buyer's agent for a commercial property?

The answers from previous questions were not clear to me. How about in PA? If you already have a broker representing you, the buyer, check disclosure for you, etc, how critical is to hire a lawyer for agreement? Costs do add up, especially for a budge tight buyer. Thank you.
In Buying Property - Asked by chao l. - Dec 16, 2011
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Answer(s)

Rob M.
Lender/Mortgage Broker
Houston, TX

Everything is negotiable. From past experience the seller will typically pay the agent's commission. Good buyer's agents will clarify who is paying the commissions at the start of a transaction. Most agents are not Lawyers and cannot give legal advice to clients or customers. For your own protection it's better to pay a little more up front that get it in the rear.

Dec 16, 2011
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Michael E.
Broker/Agent
Houston, TX

Generally the seller will pay the commission for a buyers agent (it is split between the two agents) BUT sometimes the seller does not pay commissions and the buyer will have to pay their agent the commission...this is rare. As Rob mentioned, you should clarify who will be paying the commissions at the start of the transaction as it is negotiable.
As far as getting a lawyer is concerned, if there is something in the contract you do not understand, it is advisable to get a lawyer. You can learn a lot on Google though :-)

Dec 16, 2011
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Joy R.
Owner/Investor
Detroit, MI

Same as residential. Seller pays.

Dec 20, 2011
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barry s.
Broker/Agent
arverne, NY

For a general agent, he is typically the sellers agent, and is paid by the seller even though he brings in the buyer. But if a buyer hire's a buying agent, who is only representing a buyer, then the buyer is to be paying his agent.

Dec 20, 2011
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Charles C. C.
Researcher
Medford, OR

It depends on the what is wrote on the contract. In addition what is customary in the locale you are in.
Check with your local Board of Realtors. They can help. Knowing a Real Estate Attorney is possibly a
have-must with Commercail Property. A budget tight scenario may be tough with out expense and reserve accounting. You better know your APOD ( Annual Property OPerating Data ) first and foremost. I had a broker burn me with hard lessons ,like renting to any dead-beat in town just to tell
me he had full-occupancy, WRONG! To concur with Rob M. normally the seller handles the commisssions. I was on a tight budgeted property in the 80's and learned some tough lessons.

Dec 21, 2011
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