Does "Agricultural" property mean that the land cannot be developed even after sale?

The "Agricultural" property as defined by the Listers is land that has not been developed. Does the"Agricultural" property remain undeveloped even after being sold?
In Selling Property - Asked by Monobina M. - Mar 20, 2013
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Answer(s)

janet l.
Broker/Agent
Kennesaw, GA

Generally agricultural zoning can be changed to residential zoning at the local govern't board. 1-2 acre tracts are common for houses and rezoning into smaller lots for SD usually requires more work before a zoning commission with hearings so neighbors can give input. If you plan on putting in business or commercial project it may be harder to convince neighbors that tranquility won't be lost. Boards are sometimes reluctant to grant that kind of change. You might want to call zoning commission to see what you can do and how to go about process.

Mar 21, 2013
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Stephen S.
Broker/Agent
New York, NY

Ag land can be developed if there are no deed restrictions or covenants which will not allow development and if the zoning allows development.
If the land is in an Ag District and receives property tax benefits there will be penalties but this is limited to the area developed. In New York those penalties can be high especially if the land is enlisted in the 480a forestry law. Alex@optimalspaces

Mar 21, 2013
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Robert M.
Property/Asset Manager
Exeter, NH

Check local law and zoning requirements. Lowered assessment values of land as " Special Use " or " agricultural" may require some large penalty to be paid in order take the property back out of special use for future development, and may be subject to State and/or local board approvals. This sounds as though it was not a special arrangement on assessment, just land formerly used in agriculture now having a higher use due to area development. Town zoning board of adjustment can tell you any restrictions on redevelopment.

Mar 21, 2013
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Brandi H.
Broker/Agent
Carthage, MO

Not necessarily. It is always best to run a deed or title search from a local and reputable Title company. The cost for these in our Missouri area run approximately $175.00-but specifically ask the title company to include Restriction and Covenants-they are not always included in the report.. As previously stated, it will show if there are "known" and "recorded" restrictions or covenants. Then check with your local Ag state/ county department for any records they may have concerning the property when used for agricultural purposes. Be wary, for example-once you covert the property to "Commercial" zoning, there will most likely be an immediate impact to your wallet for tax assessments based on the new higher value of the land. It is difficult sometimes to convert back should you decide to move the property back under the canopy of Agriculture. Best of luck!

Mar 21, 2013
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Anthony P.
Broker/Agent
Clermont, FL

What does the local zoning authority say? The restrictions for re-development can be found in the county zoning offices. Check the future land use plan. Variances maybe necessary to change the use and density.

Mar 28, 2013
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