Can a residential real estate Agent bring a commercial tenant to the table DIRECTLY & get full commission?

In other words, can I (Residential Agent) simply bring the Tenant to the Table and receive the full commission as Tenant's agent, or do I have to REFER the commercial Tenant to a Commercial Agent/Broker who then will represent that Tenant and only pay me a referral fee? I am in Texas. Thanks in advance!
In Leasing Property - Asked by Lucas B. - Nov 17, 2015
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Answer(s)

Timothy C.
Broker/Agent
Chesapeake, VA

As horrible as this sounds, a residential agent should refer the tenant to a commercial agent. Most commercial agents (i estimate about 98%) have no idea even what they don't even know and will harm the tenant. I've been an expert witness against residential agents in these situations.

Nov 17, 2015
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IRFAN H.
Broker/Agent
Boca Raton, FL

yes you can

Nov 18, 2015
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Paul M.
Broker/Agent
Rochester, MN

Yes you can, after all you are a licensed agent to conduct real estate whether it is residential or commercial. However, if you are not familiar with commercial real estate, you could be doing a disservice to your client by advancing your personal gain. Id recommend referring this to a commercial expert until you are more seasoned in commercial RE.

Nov 18, 2015
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Brian W.
Broker/Agent
Phoenix, AZ

Would you ask your podiatrist to perform brain surgery?

Nov 19, 2015
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Toby B.
Broker/Agent
Delaware, OH

Fun to see the ansers to this question. If falls on two lines of thinking -- legal vs. practical.
LEGALLY of course you can. You are licensed to represent buyers and sellers in real estate transactions across the state.
PRACTICALLY it isn't the best idea. You are practicing a completely different form or real estate -- like the food doctor doing brain surgery mentions before -- and it might become an E&O issue if you were to be sued. When I launched my brokerage, I had to find special E&O as commercial real estate is only eclipsed by property management for number of claims filed.
If you do choose to go forward run through your broker and I'd strongly reccomend having a real estate attorney review the agreement for YOU. Not the client. Key distinction. You want an attorney that will put his butt on the line IF / WHEN you get sued.

Nov 19, 2015
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Charles W.
Broker/Agent
Bolinas, CA

It's not THAT different. You have a landlord and a tenant and a lease agreement. As an agent, you can handle bringing the two parties together. However, I would agree with the last comment - have an attorney review the lease agreement. The terms are likely to be different. i.e. commercial leases are usually for a number of years, can contain clauses such as escalations, percentage of gross sales, etc.

Nov 20, 2015
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Simon C.
Broker/Agent
New York, NY

If you're legally licensed in New York, you are allowed to do any type of real estate transaction .. this includes commercial, residential, sales, investment, warehouse and etc. My advice is you contact an experienced commercial broker that specializes in what your tenant is looking for and negotiate a referral fee.

Feb 1, 2017
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